Vinyl: A Durable and Malleable Textile Option

Look around: It is likely something in your room is made of vinyl. This man-made substance is the second largest manufactured plastic in the world (send only to Polyethylene), and was initially developed by engineers who wanted to make a material that was cheap to produce and use for common items, while not skimping on the durability of the product. Vinyl can be used to make anything as soft as clothing (gloves, jackets) to as rigid as siding and flooring on homes, making it just about as texturally versatile as it is durable.

Developed in 1920 (on accident) by Dr. Waldo Semon, Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) was developed during a search for a more affordable and easier to produce adhesive. Upon the discovery of the textural malleability, further tests and applications were done before realizing the true potential of the synthetic material they had created.

At Fieldtex, we use vinyl in our bags that need added durability, or that are going to be transporting product that needs extra protection from weathering. Vinyl is moisture, humidity, and abrasion resistant, placing it high on the durability spectrum. This gives vinyl products (especially carrying cases, even ones that are used on a day-to-day basis) a long life. It is also easier to recycle vinyl than other plastics, which leads to the material itself being reused rather than going to waste.

Vinyl is a major player in all industries, but especially in the medical industry. The ability to shape and mold this material allows for innumerable applications from fluid bags to catheters. Perhaps one of the most important medical applications is for carrying cases in the field. Using a carrying case is necessary as a First Responder as a method of tool and product organization and easy transport. Vinyl is ideal for this due to its durability and ability to protect whatever you carry inside from common threats that could cause damage to medical products inside.

While sewing with vinyl could be more difficult in home, our industrial sewing machines have no problem with this thicker textile, and our Prototype and Design department use this fabric regularly. Our experience with vinyl can help your product come to market and be more durable than initially conceived.